What is the leading cause of preventable death in Afghanistan?

What is the leading cause of preventable death in Afghanistan?

Notwithstanding this progress, Afghanistan still has a heavy burden of child deaths due to preventable causes such as diarrhoea and pneumonia, which have overlapping risk factors.

Why does Afghanistan have a high death rate?

Conflict, poverty, poor health services and low levels of female education and rights combined to produce extremely high mortality rates for Afghan newborns, older infants and very young children. But finally, after 15 years of Western-backed civilian rule, their chances of survival are improving dramatically.

What are the top death causes?

The top global causes of death, in order of total number of lives lost, are associated with three broad topics: cardiovascular (ischaemic heart disease, stroke), respiratory (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, lower respiratory infections) and neonatal conditions – which include birth asphyxia and birth trauma.

Why is infant mortality rate so high in Afghanistan?

Afghanistan has the highest infant mortality rate of 110.6. Much of Afghanistan is rural and recovering from years of conflict. Because communities are very spread out, and most people travel by foot, accessing healthcare is very difficult, especially for pregnant women and young babies.

What is the death rate for Afghanistan?

Afghanistan Crude death rate

Change, % Date Value
-2.31 % 2018 6.42
-2.70 % 2016 6.74
-2.48 % 2017 6.58
-3.89 % 2010 8.25

What is world death rate?

As of 2020, the CIA estimates the U.S. crude death rate will be 8.3 per 1,000, while it estimates that the global rate will be 7.7 per 1,000. According to the World Health Organization, the ten leading causes of death, globally, in 2016, for both sexes and all ages, were as presented in the table below.

What diseases can you get from Afghanistan?

Major Diseases

  • Tuberculosis. Tuberculosis is endemic in Afghanistan, with over 76,000 cases reported per year.
  • HIV. The prevalence of HIV in Afghanistan is 0.04%.
  • Poliomyelitis.
  • Pneumonia.
  • Malnutrition.
  • Leprosy.
  • Typhoid fever.
  • Hepatitis A.

What are the top 5 preventable deaths?

The estimated average number of potentially preventable deaths for the five leading causes of death in persons aged <80 years were 91,757 for diseases of the heart, 84,443 for cancer, 28,831 for chronic lower respiratory diseases, 16,973 for cerebrovascular diseases (stroke), and 36,836 for unintentional injuries ( …

What kills the most humans every year?

List

Source: CNET Source: Business Insider
Animal Humans killed per year
1 Mosquitoes 750,000
2 Humans (homicides only) 437,000
3 Snakes 100,000

What are the most common causes of death in Afghanistan?

Of all the deaths in Afghanistan according to the 2014 data, coronary heart disease accounted for a little more than 9 percent. The age adjusted death rate for this disease calculates to 193.21 per 100,000 people ranking Afghanistan twentieth in the world. Pneumonia: Lung inflammation caused by bacterial or viral infection.

What was the death rate in Afghanistan in 2014?

Of all the deaths in Afghanistan according to the 2014 data, coronary heart disease accounted for a little more than 9 percent. The age adjusted death rate for this disease calculates to 193.21 per 100,000 people ranking Afghanistan twentieth in the world.

What are the leading causes of DALYs in Afghanistan?

In Afghanistan, the top three causes of DALYs in 2010 were lower respiratory infections, diarrheal diseases, and major depressive disorder. Two causes that appeared in the 10 leading causes of DALYs in 2010 and not 1990 were road injury and tuberculosis.

How many people die from diarrhoeal diseases in Afghanistan?

In 2014, 15,977 people or 7.10 percent of the population died because of diarrhoeal diseases. This often can be prevented by drinking safe, clean water and access to adequate sanitation which many Afghans cannot accomplish.

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